The Child Support Enforcement Office is a great resource for parents who need help with child support. Parents can get help establishing, collecting, and paying child support through this office.  Read on to learn about their services and how to apply. 

Child Support Establishment and Collection

The Child Support Enforcement Office is a program operated by the State of Nevada that can assist parents in many ways.  Services offered include:

  • Establishing paternity of minor children
  • Locating non-custodial parents
  • Establishing a child support order
  • Enforcing a child support order
  • Modifying an existing child support order

FYI!

Child Support Enforcement does not get involved in custody and visitation issues.   If you need a custody an visitation schedule, you generally need to File for Custody.  The judge who handles your custody case can also set child support.

Either parent can apply for services.  There is no fee to apply, but there may be an annual fee of $25 for their services.  

Child support is initially set as a percentage of the non-custodial parent’s income.  There may be adjustments to the amount ordered, but as a general rule, child support is set at: 

  • For 1 child: 18% of the noncustodial parent’s gross monthly income
  • For 2 children: 25% of the noncustodial parent’s gross monthly income
  • For 3 children: 29% of the noncustodial parent’s gross monthly income
  • Plus an additional 2% for each additional child

Once a child support order is established, the enforcement office can collect the money through wage garnishments, IRS tax refund intercepts, and driver’s license suspensions.  The State of Nevada collects and distributes child support payments.

For more information about the services the Child Support Enforcement Office provides and how to apply, please visit their site at Child Support Enforcement Office.  You can also search for an office location office in Northern Nevada and Southern Nevada

About This Website

This website is intended to provide general information, forms, and resources for people who are representing themselves in Nevada's courts without a lawyer. There may be additional information you need to know depending on where your case is being handled. If you will be representing yourself in Clark County or Washoe County, you should visit those self-help websites for specialized forms and instructions.